Sunday, January 27, 2008

roofings, continued.

The roof is going on.

Here's the studio - roof on - looking out the hole that still remains where the fireplace will go. Eventually.
Below, the cathedral-ceilinged bedroom stands out, as the main roof is still off. The Dulles Airport-like roof to the right of the bedroom is over the porch, and will tie into the main roof.
I find it amazing to look at this structure! Here's the bedroom ceiling close up.
The courtyard is finally frozen hard enough to walk without accumulating heavy pancakes of mud on my wellies. Below: a view from the courtyard out to the front.Meanwhile, I look forward to seeing the front "yard" restored to meadow clearing - minus construction skiffs and lumber stores and scraps. I've been haunting all the garden catalogues and trying out a million and one colour and plant combinations in my mind. How's this one for a gorgeous day dream: a wildflower field of Queen Anne's Lace, Echinacea, and Cosmos? oooooooh! gorgeous. . . . .

4 comments:

queenie said...

OK - ok. . . . further research reveals that gardeners regularly rue the day they actually planted Queen Anne's Lace.

They use words like: "Noxious" "Invasive" "Relentless" "Smothering"

Perhaps we'll hold off on the QA's Lace. . . .

sheryl said...

I read somewhere that Queen Anne's Lace is also known as "cow's parsley". Must have read that in a book recently. Though it is pretty and delicate...

queenie said...

Apparently it's a sort of wild carrot - if you can imagine. Besides "Wild Carrot", Google advises that it's also known as Birds Nest Weed, Bees Nest, Devils Plague, Garden Carrot, Bird's Nest Root, Fools Parsley, and Lace Flower. Some of those names are pretty scary, eh?

Delicate it may be, but apparently very tenacious.

Like you, I think it's beautiful. . . .

Joyful said...

Ai Yi Yi! Forget the QA's lace!
One plant, maybe ---- they are gorgeous, but be prepared to tear up seedlings. Whisper to yourself "lysismachia" whenever you're not sure of the habits of a plant!!! I will admit to digging up some roadside specimens for transplanting to my garden.....they wisely committed suicide.